Events/News

Art in Embassies, US Department of State
Dili, Timor-Leste

Established in 1963, the U.S.Department of State’s office of Art in Embassies (AID) plays a vital role in our nation’s public diplomacy through aculturally expanisive mission, creating temporary and permanent exhibitions, artist programming and publications… exhibitions provide international audiences with a sense of the quality, scope and diversity of both countries’ art and culture, establishing AIE’s presence in more countries than any other U.S. foundation or arts organization.”

“AIE’s exhibitions allow citizens, many of who might never travel to the United States, to personally experience the depth and breadth of our artistic heritage and values, making what has been called a ‘footprint that can be left where people have no opportunity to see American art’”
https://art.state.gov

“We selected works that embody both the spiritual and physical elements of Timor-Leste’s identity, which integrated themese of strength and Timorese’s close relationship to the mountains and the sea. Ramona Candy’s works reflect the omnipresence of the country’s small sellers; fruits and vegetables, fish, meat and other bounty of this land.” – Ambassador C. Kevin Blackstone and Mrs. Alexander Blackstone (Dili, Timor-Leste, January 2022)

SU-CASA ARTIST RESIDENCY
Brooklyn Arts Council
Willoughby Neighborhood Senior Center

“Brooklyn Arts Council’s SU-CASA Creative Aging program, funded by the New York City Council, the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, and the NYC Department for the Aging, provides opportunities for seniors to actively express themselves creatively, socialize with a culturally engaged collective of senior citizens, engage in cultural performances, and master techniques in a variety of arts disciplines.” https://grantees.brooklynartscouncil.org/2022-su-casa-awardees/ramona-candy/

 

History Meets Art

A History Lesson.
An Art Lesson.
A Lesson in Sankofa.

Our History Our Pride is a powerful exhibition, artist's talk, and art workshop. This multidimensional program introduces participants to little-known figures in Black history while also encouraging participants to recognize and celebrate their own cultural/family history. Presented by motivational artist, Ramona Candy, the exhibition and talk are followed by a "make and take" workshop that helps participants create collages that pay homage to their own ancestors.
Our History, Our Pride is Ideal for schools (grades 6–12), college students, church initiatives, libraries, community education, and other creative groupings.

Black History/365 ... learn and share something new every day.

OHOP at studio

"Additional images of Our History, Our Pride can be found on the gallery page."

Our History, Our Pride
History Meets Art Workshop

History Meets Art when motivational artist Ramona Candy presents her three-part “Our History, Our Pride” program. She begins with an exhibition of her collage and mixed-media portraits of Black men and women (from the 1800s to present), many of whom have been overlooked or omitted from history books and annual Black history celebrations.

Referencing the West African Adinkra symbol which represents Sankofa ("looking back to go forward"), Ramona shares stories of the lives, contributions, and sacrifices of these ancestors and explains how relevant they were and are to the American story. She then leads participants through and beyond this history, to highlight the importance of reviewing personal stories, even if just one generation away.

The culminating activity of “Our History, Our Pride” is a fun and thought-provoking hands-on workshop. Ramona invites participants to create mini-collages on a chosen subject, person (or people.) She encourages all to explore colors, patterns, textures, and shapes as they weave memories of their own ancestors into the artwork they create.

To see a sample workshop, check out YouTube video http://bit.ly/2LhkYrY

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